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Archive for the ‘Dragon Jokes’ Category

This coming weekend is SpoCon, the annual science fiction convention in my home town. I’m volunteering there as Director of Programming. It’s a year-round thing, really, as I recruit speakers and gather ideas for panels and other events during the weekend. At times, I’m called upon to really BE a dragon as people want to come at the last minute and demand time in the schedule, or they can’t come and I have to find alternative panelists, or they want to know why I didn’t know something that nobody ever told me. It’s stressful, but I really feel good about this year’s convention.

The reason I mention this is that many of you following my blog are writers and artists, or you aspire to be. So I want to recommend that if there’s a local SF convention near you, you ought to be attending. In addition to the technical skills and emotional endurance required for writing, making connections with other writers and artists is a huge benefit.

At SF conventions, you can make friends who encourage you after rejections. You can get work critiqued. You can listen in while older writers and artists talk shop. Some conventions are more juried than others, but the chances are you can get on a few panels. That helps you develop your publicity skills and builds credit with an audience that you are, in fact, a Real Writer/Artist.

The weekends do cost money. There can be travel, lodging, and other expenses even if your membership is comped for doing panels. Think of it as an investment in yourself and your career.

Plus, there will be dragons everywhere! In the art show, in the dealers room, in the games, in the costumes… Who doesn’t want to go see some dragons?


Wyrmflight: A Hoard of Dragon Lore — $4.99 e-book or $17.99 trade paperback. Available at Amazon or Draft2Digital.

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IMG_20180716_072515692I’ve already met several beer-bottle dragons. There’s Dragon’s Breath from Bayern Brewery, and Dragon’s Milk from New Holland Brewing. Now my son brought home Gulden Draak, an imported beer from Van Steenberge in Belgium.

The reflections make it a bit hard to see, but this dragon is outlined with rivets. To me, this gives it a distinctive Steamunk vibe.


Wyrmflight: A Hoard of Dragon Lore — $4.99 e-book or $17.99 trade paperback. Available at Amazon or Draft2Digital.

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IMG_20180303_154747890Here’s another dragon I met in the grocery store. It’s on a tin of Newman’s Own brand mints. These are ginger flavored. Nummy!

This dragon is so cute with his bushy eyebrows and crazy moustache. Not to mention the tongue action.


Wyrmflight: A Hoard of Dragon Lore — $4.99 e-book or $17.99 trade paperback. Available at Amazon or Draft2Digital.

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Dragon_Radish

“Dragon” radishes. Photo by Deby Fredericks, 2018.

Last time I shared a photo of a dragonfly from my garden. This time I have a more delicious dragon to share.

These are “Dragon” radishes, a favorite variety of mine. They grow fast, like all radishes, with that nice peppery burn.

My previous plantings didn’t do well. Either maggots infested them or the neighborhood cats dug up the soil before they sprouted. This year was the charm. They are great in salads. Definitely worth the wait!


Wyrmflight: A Hoard of Dragon Lore — $4.99 e-book or $17.99 trade paperback. Available at Amazon or Draft2Digital.

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BlueEyedDarner

Remains of a Blue Eyed Darner dragonfly. Photo by Deby Fredericks, June 12, 2018.

I am both happy and sad to share today’s discovery with you. What is it? The remains of a dragonfly, found in my back yard.

The reason I’m happy is that I had at least one dragonfly in my garden. I garden as close to chemical-free as possible, which means there is always the possibility of an insect attack. Finding a predator bug is always good news.

If I’m right, this was a Blue-Eyed Darner, Rhionaeschna multicolor. It’s one of the more common dragonflies in the western U. S. and usually the first species to appear in spring. From the vivid coloration, it was a male. Females have a more drab appearance.

I’m sad that it’s dead, because dragonflies are simply amazing. It saddens me to pick up the frail shell of what should be a lively, fierce flyer. We have had chilly temperatures overnight for the past few days. I suspect this is what brought him down.

Still, I’m glad to know my garden was home to a ferocious dragon — at least for a little while.


Wyrmflight: A Hoard of Dragon Lore — $4.99 e-book or $17.99 trade paperback. Available at Amazon or Draft2Digital.

 

 

 

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With a name as evocative as “Dragon’s Breath,” perhaps it shouldn’t be surprising that people have applied it to a variety of products. Not only does Dragon’s Breath ammunition turn your shotgun into a flame thrower. Not only does Dragon’s Breath dessert make you breathe steam like the proverbial dragon.

You can also drink Dragon’s Breath beer. You can take a street drug called Dragon’s Breath or Devil’s Breath that allegedly makes you act like a zombie. (Why would you want to do that? Maybe it’s better not to know.)

In a more peaceful vein, you can plant Dragon’s Breath peppers. I’ll bet they’re spicy-hot! Or there’s Dragon’s Breath celosia, with a plume-like flower in shades of red, pink and orange. I wouldn’t mind that one.

Then again, there’s also a gemstone called Dragon’s breath. It’s a type of fire opal mined only in Mexico.

Yeah, sign me up for that last one!


Wyrmflight: A Hoard of Dragon Lore — $4.99 e-book or $17.99 trade paperback. Available at Amazon or Draft2Digital.

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Earlier this year, I posted on a specialty dessert called Dragon’s Breath. Now I find the name is shared with a type of ammunition. These are 12-gauge shotgun shells loaded with magnesium pellets rather than the standard lead or other metal. When fired, these shells cause a remarkable, though short-lived, blast of flame!

Advertisements claim that the flame is at least 100 feet/30 meters and possibly up to 3 times that length. (This is an advertisement, bear in mind, not a scientifically documented study.) They say it can substitute for a road flare or even a flame thrower (!) should you ever have need of one. Ads also suggest that Dragon’s Breath shells would be perfect for home defense. Very intimidating, you see.

Well, I’m sure it would be… However, since magnesium flame can burn at over 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit, there would be a great risk of destroying the home you were trying to save. Not to mention the chance of gruesome injuries to anyone in the flame’s path, whether or not they were invading the home.

Am I the only one who thinks this would be insanely dangerous?

Apparently not. These shells are illegal in three U. S. states (Illinois, Florida and California) and have to be treated as a hazardous material where they are legal. There is also some debate whether these shells should be regulated under the United Nations Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons. My guess is that Dragon’s Breath is useful chiefly for the entertainment value of the spectacular flame.


There’s lots more dragony fun in my book, Wyrmflight: A Hoard of Dragon Lore — $4.99 e-book or $17.99 trade paperback. Look for it at Amazon or Draft2Digital.

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…How Would They Breathe Fire? That’s the heading of this article from Howstuffworks.com. The author, Laurie L. Dove, offers a fun and fascinating look at the tools available in nature for any creature to have fire breath. I won’t steal her thunder by recapping here. Just read and enjoy her article.


Sign up for my newsletter and win a free E-book, The Weight of Their Souls. Just to go my Facebook page, AuthorDebyFredericks, and click the link on the left that says “Join my mailing list.” Easy, right?

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One of the hot food fads in 2017 was actually extremely cold. “Dragon’s Breath” is a dessert created by dipping cereal balls in liquid nitrogen. Yes, you heard that right.

The cereal balls are served in a cup. You pick them up with skewers, so you don’t get freezer-burn on your fingertips. Once the frozen treat encounters your warm mouth, it produces billowing vapors that are said to look like a dragon’s breath. I’m picturing something like dry ice in a punch bowl.

This specialty dessert was first created in South Korea and the Philippines during 2015. It  now appears in restaurants and at county fairs all the over the world. Shared videos of the spectacular “dragon’s breath” have no doubt contributed to its popularity.

Naturally, there are some safety concerns. Liquid nitrogen is a hazardous material and has to be handled carefully. There have been scattered reports of burns in the mouth or on the hands while eating dragon’s breath. In addition, having too much nitrogen introduced to a closed area could theoretically create a danger of asphyxiation.

It does sound… well, cool (ha ha)! But I’m not sure I’d be willing to try it.


Sign up for my newsletter and win a free E-book, The Weight of Their Souls. Just to go my Facebook page, AuthorDebyFredericks, and click the link on the left that says “Join my mailing list.” Easy, right?

 

 

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My husband stumbled across a documentary on Netflix a few weeks ago. The Wreck of the Unbelievable detailed the discovery of an ancient shipwreck off the coast of East Africa. Among the items recovered were several statues encrusted with barnacles, coral, and other sea life. The one that caught my attention was a monumental six-headed dragon squaring off to battle an equally large warrior.

I love ruins and relics, so this drew me right in. The film went on to detail conflicts among the crew, the danger of storms at sea, and even African villagers saying how curious they were about what those foreigners were doing out there on their ship.

However, a part of my brain was whispering doubts. Items under water since the 1st Century shouldn’t be so clean. And didn’t that one look sort of like Mickey Mouse? So I went to do a little research. I found out my eyes were wrong while my brain got it right.

The Wreck of the Unbelievable was actually a mockumentary created to build excitement around an exhibition by the British artist Damien Hirst. The “treasures” recovered from the “wreck” were contemporary art, sea life and all. That includes the six-headed dragon and warrior sculptures. It all appeared in a Venetian museum in 2017. You can read arts coverage here.

Now, I have no special grudge against Hirst for creating a mockumentary. As a writer, I spend a certain amount of time trying to build excitement around my own books. Still, this is something of a cautionary tale. I’m glad I did that follow-up on the film I saw. Otherwise, I could have passed off fiction as fact just like any rube who saw a side show at the circus.


Sign up for my newsletter and win a free E-book, The Weight of Their Souls. Just to go my Facebook page, AuthorDebyFredericks, and click the link on the left that says “Join my mailing list.” Easy, right?

 

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