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Please welcome Sheriff Chuck Davis of Gallup, New Mexico. This character is from David Lee Summers’ historical paranormal novella, Breaking the Code.

Sheriff Chuck Davis blinked as he entered a room full of dancers in bright gowns. Did some of them have wings? He realized he held his revolver and holstered it. The last thing he knew, he’d been standing in the desert when a skinwalker appeared from behind a mesquite bush. He fired at the creature which looked like a human-sized snarling coyote that stood on two legs. There had been a bright flash of light and then he was here … wherever this was. A majestic figure at the front of the room stood. “I am Queen Titania. Welcome to our realm, Sheriff Davis.”


Character Questions

Who are the most dangerous people in your world? By far, the most dangerous people in my world are the Nazis who are trying to take over Europe. We have some good people in town who want to enlist and stop them, but there’s a shape-changing monster called a skinwalker scaring people and it may have even killed a young man. I’m not sure yet, but I wonder if there’s some connection between this monster and the Nazis.

What is the weather like where you live? It’s winter where I live in Northern New Mexico. We’ve just had some bad snow storms which are making it hard for me to track down the skinwalker, but you can be sure I’ll find it.

Author Questions

What’s your process for deciding where to submit your work? In the case of Breaking the Code, the editor came to me and asked for a story pitch. I sent her two ideas that she rejected, but the third time was the charm and she asked me to develop the story that became Breaking the Code. Of course, most of the time we aren’t lucky enough to have an editor soliciting stories from us. Once I’m satisfied enough with a story to send it out, I look at the genre, characters, and tone and think about markets where the story might be a good fit. I also think about editors who would enjoy the story I created. All of this has been helped over the years by networking with authors and editors at conventions.

How do you handle multiple points of view in a story? I like telling stories from multiple points of view. The challenge is not to have too many point-of-view characters. I try to identify the main characters who drive the narrative and let them tell the story. Most of the time, I write my stories from a limited, third-person point of view. Effectively, I follow one of my primary characters for a scene or a chapter and tell the story as though I’m watching the action over their shoulder.


Breaking the Code

1942. Gallup, New Mexico. Marine recruiters have come to town looking to fill their ranks with a secret weapon against the Axis powers — what would become Navajo Code Talkers — but not everyone supports the prospect of young native men going off to war.

When one new recruit is found dead, and a rancher’s cattle are mutilated, whispers of witchcraft and skinwalker filter through the town, and interest in enlisting wanes. Is there evil afoot, or is that just what opponents to the cause want everyone to think? Whether guided by magic, mischief, or malevolence, without a doubt, nothing is as it seems…

Get it from Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08RW4CMR8/

Get it from Barnes and Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/breaking-the-code-david-lee-summers/1138551544?ean=9781949691627

About David Lee Summers

David Lee Summers lives in Southern New Mexico at the cusp of the western and final frontiers. He’s written novels about space pirates, vampire mercenaries, mad scientists in the old west, and astronomer ghosts. He’s edited thrilling anthologies of space adventure that imagine what worlds discovered by NASA’s Kepler mission might be like. When he’s not writing or editing, David explores the universe for real at Kitt Peak National Observatory.

David’s website:
http://www.davidleesummers.com

David’s blog:
https://davidleesummers.wordpress.com


Have you read one of my books? Then it would be great for you to leave a review! Meanwhile, if you’d like to learn more about me and my work, check out my websiteFacebook, Instagram and/or Twitter.

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