Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘urban fantasy’

I’m super excited to be making a blog visit today. C. S. Boyack is hosting me for an episode of Lisa Burton Radio on his blog, Entertaining Stories.

Well, technically, it will be Dan Forster, the main character of my dark fantasy novelette The Gellboar, who will be visiting Boyack’s character, Lisa Burton. They’ll talk about Dan’s situation, what exactly a Gellboar is, and much more.

I hope you’ll stop by Entertaining Stories and leave your comments and questions. Cheers!


Sign up for my newsletter and win a free E-book, The Weight of Their Souls. Just to go my Facebook page, AuthorDebyFredericks, and click the link on the left that says “Join my mailing list.” Easy, right?.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Here’s a fun debut novel that mashes up Chinese folklore, urban fantasy, comic book heroes and martial arts adventure in a lively package. The main character is Missy Masters, street magician and descendant of a famous super-hero, Mr. Mystic. Good old grandpa has been missing for a while when Missy suddenly inherits his powers. She can control shadows and travel through a mysterious Shadow Realm inhabited by demonic beings who really want a yummy human snack.

Missy attempts to take up her grandfather’s name and career, but discovers  how difficult the life can be. After barely escaping a super-battle, she heads out to China in hopes of finding the immortal dragon who once trained her grandfather. She does, and then becomes embroiled in the complicated dynamics of a dragon court where the most powerful beings have very little use for humans.

The plot braids together two stories, “then” (her years in China) and “now,” her life since returning to San Francisco. There’s plenty to enjoy in the martial-arts battles, scary-cool creatures from Chinese myth, a slightly scary super-hero organization, and the race to save the world from an evil dragon, Lung Di.

It’s a fun read, with lots of banter, moderate violence and sex. If you like urban fantasy or martial arts, this one is worth checking out.

 

Read Full Post »

We return to the alt-future Los Angeles of Van Eekhout’s Daniel Blackland trilogy for the con of a lifetime and the finale. If you haven’t read these books, perhaps you should skip the rest of this post because of spoilers.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Ready?

At the end of Pacific Fire, Daniel and his adopted son, Sam, were racing each other for the right to sacrifice their own lives in order to destroy the pacific firedrake created by a consortium of bad guys (and one not so bad). Which is, by the way, one of the best father/son scenes I’ve read in years. Sam won the dubious honor. His personality now inhabits a fire-breathing monster that roams the kingdom of Southern California torching neighborhoods because it can.

Daniel has gathered a posse to try and somehow get Sam out of the dragon’s body. They include old friends Moth, Cassandra, and Sam’s sort-of girlfriend Em. After a failed rescue attempt, guerilla fighters from the enemy kingdom of Northern California swoop in to abduct the firedrake. Now the race is on. Joined by the not-so-bad mage, Gabriel Argent, and his BFF, Max the magic-hound, Daniel heads north to get the one object that can save Sam.

This he does by impersonating his clone-brother, Paul, who met his fate at the end of Pacific Fire. To be fair, Paul tried to kill Daniel but Daniel turned the tables. Now Daniel has to navigate the treacherous waters of Paul’s life, including mentors, friends, lovers,  and Paul’s four-year-old daughter (a monstrosity in her own right). Not to mention the mother who left Daniel behind all those years ago. Virtually everyone is insanely ambitious, and some of them keep trying to kill him.

Meanwhile, Sam struggles and fails to stop the firedrake’s rampages. He encounters a young woman named Annabel, one of the original Hierarch’s numberless victims. Together they search for answers, penetrating the thickets of the dragon’s brain, only to confront their mutual worst nightmare. All this while Cassandra, Gabriel and Max face their own moments of decision between loyalty and justice.

As in previous books, there’s a lot of crazy magic and horrific references, leavened by snappy banter. The caper moves throughout. But this series is really about characters who lay it all on the line for family and friendship. Add in the pacific firedrake, and there’s not much more you could ask for.

Read Full Post »

I saw these books in the library and thought to myself, “Finally! An urban fantasy with dragons.” Well, yes and no. Relatively little time is spent with the dragons, and unfortunately the human characters didn’t make up for it. At least, not for me, but we all know how picky I am.

The cast was not terribly diverse, and most characters were some level of stereotype. I had trouble connecting with the main character, Tori. She’s spoiled and entitled and naturally gifted and beautiful, and has no idea how she’s treating others. She does come around, but then has a silly inferiority complex even after gaining more special powers than everyone else. Add that to her simultaneous crushing on two boys, and… sigh. I wanted to cheer for her more than I did.

In terms of plot, I felt several characters were being deliberately dense and not figuring out clues that seemed fairly obvious. I won’t say more because spoilers aren’t nice.

The dragons were what I really wanted to see. I love when writers come up with new concepts for this amazing mythical beast. Hill’s dragons lurked offstage most of the time. The one that showed up was suitably impressive and dangerous, but had no independent personality. With the focus so much on the human antagonist, Overdrake, the dragons didn’t really stand out.

I did enjoy the master villain, who was appropriately devious and cruel. The way he uses Tori’s special power to heckle her was amusing. If I check out future volumes, it will be because of Overdrake.

Read Full Post »